What is another word for gatherers?

Pronunciation: [ɡˈaðəɹəz] (IPA)

Gatherers are individuals or entities that collect or gather a wide range of items or resources. Synonyms for the word gatherers include collectors, harvesters, pickers, scavengers, foragers, gatherer ants, gatherer bees, gatherer birds, gatherer fish, gatherer mammals and more. Collectors gather items or artefacts for collections or as a hobby, whereas, harvesters gather crops or natural resources. Pickers gather fruits, vegetables, or berries, and scavengers gather food or materials that are discarded by others. On the other hand, foragers collect wild edibles to support their diet. Gatherer ants, bees, birds, fish and mammals gather their food or resources in their respective ways to ensure their survival.

Synonyms for Gatherers:

What are the paraphrases for Gatherers?

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What are the hypernyms for Gatherers?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Usage examples for Gatherers

7990. If it was paid in ready money, I suppose you would have a chance of getting some of the custom of these kelp-gatherers?
"Second Shetland Truck System Report"
William Guthrie
It's dedicated 'To the Wool-gatherers.
"Ethel Morton at Chautauqua"
Mabell S. C. Smith
It was not till the monarchy had fortified the royal city and palace, established a body-guard and standing troops, magistrates and tax-gatherers, and had entered into close relation with the priests, that it obtained security and permanence.
"The History of Antiquity, Vol. II (of VI)"
Max Duncker

Famous quotes with Gatherers

  • It was considered the most dangerous route in the Hills, but as my reputation as a rider and quick shot was well known, I was molested very little, for the toll gatherers looked on me as being a good fellow, and they knew that I never missed my mark.
    Calamity Jane
  • Well, now, this is exactly my case. I am in love; and my sweetheart is LIBERTY. Be that heavenly nymph my companion, and these wilds and .Woods shall have charms beyond London and Paris in slavery. To have no proud monarch driving over me with his gilt coaches; nor his host of excise-men and tax-gatherers insulting and robbing me ; but to be my own master, my own prince and sovereign, gloriously preserving my national dignity, and 'pursuing my true happiness; planting my vineyards, and eating their lucious fruits; and sowing my fields, and reaping the golden grain: and seeing millions of ‘brothers all around me, equally free and happy as myself. “This, sir, is What I long for.” p. 155 ... On his return to Georgetown, he was asked by colonel Watson, why he looked so serious? I have cause, sir,” said he, “to look serious.” Watson "What! has general Marion refused to treat?” "No, sir.” “Well, then, has old Washington defeated sir Henery Clinton, and broke up our army ?" " No, sir, not that neither ; but worse.” “Ah! what can be worse?” "Why, sir, I have seen an American general and his officers, without pay, and almost without clothes, living on roots and drinking water ; and all for LIBERTY! What chance have we against such men!” It is said colonel Watson was not much obliged to him for this speech. But the young ofiicer was so struck with Marion’s sentiments, that he never rested until he threw up his commission, and retired from the service. ' p 156 https://books.google.com/books?pg=PA155&dq=Francis+Marion+Weems&id=G79CAQAAMAAJ#v=onepage&q=Francis%20Marion%20Weems&f=false
    Francis Marion
  • We often think, naïvely, that missing data are the primary impediments to intellectual progress—just find the right facts and all problems will dissipate. But barriers are often deeper and more abstract in thought. We must have access to the right metaphor, not only to the requisite information. Revolutionary thinkers are not, primarily, gatherers of facts, but weavers of new intellectual structures.
    Stephen Jay Gould
  • Marx imagined the end of scarcity would bring the end of history. He could not bring himself to see that a world without scarcity had already been achieved - in the prehistoric societies that he and Engels lumped together as 'primitive communism'. Hunter-gatherers were less burdened by labour than the majority of mankind at any later stage, but their sparse communities were completely dependent on the Earth's bounty. Natural catastrophe could wipe them out at any time. Marx could not accept the constraint that was the price of the hunter-gatherers' freedom. Instead, animated by the faith that humans are destined to master the Earth, he insisted that freedom from labour could be achieved without any restraints on their desires. This was only the Brethren of the Free Spirit's apocalyptic fantasy returning as an Enlightenment utopia.
    John Gray (philosopher)
  • Humans lived for several million years as fully wild beings: only in the last 10, 000 did we invent agriculture; only in the last couple of centuries did we invent industry. We are a species that has spent 99 per cent of its history as hunter-gatherers. We haven't had time for our unconscious minds and our unconscious needs to have changed. If you like, our souls have not changed, and this is true whether or not we believe that we have them.
    Simon Barnes

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