What is another word for polite company?

Pronunciation: [pəlˈa͡ɪt kˈʌmpəni] (IPA)

In polite society, having a wide range of vocabulary is a useful tool to avoid repetition of the same word. Thus, understanding the synonyms for "polite company" can help you to speak more articulately. The expression "polite company" is often used to describe a social gathering or a conversation where certain topics or language are avoided in order to maintain decorum. Other phrases that can be used to replace "polite company" include "mixed company," "respectable company," and "formal setting." These phrases are interchangeable when describing gatherings where cultural norms dictate the need for individuals to maintain decorum and politeness. It is essential to recognize the right synonym that fully reflect the nature of the context being described.

Synonyms for Polite company:

What are the hypernyms for Polite company?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Famous quotes with Polite company

  • BASIC - A programming language. Related to certain social diseases in that those who have it will not admit it in polite company.
    Anonymous
  • [I]f you want to about faith, and offer a reasoned (and reason-responsive) defense of faith as an extra category of belief worthy of special consideration, I'm eager to [participate]. I certainly grant the existence of the phenomenon of faith; what I want to see is a reasoned ground for taking faith as a , and not, say, just as a way people comfort themselves and each other (a worthy function that I do take seriously). But you must not expect me to go along with your defense of faith as a path to truth if at any point you appeal to the very dispensation you are supposedly trying to justify. Before you appeal to faith when reason has you backed into a corner, think about whether you really want to abandon reason when reason is on your side. You are sightseeing with a loved one in a foreign land, and your loved one is brutally murdered in front of your eyes. At the trial it turns out that in this land friends of the accused may be called as witnesses for the defense, testifying about their faith in his innocence. You watch the parade of his moist-eyed friends, obviously sincere, proudly proclaiming their undying faith in the innocence of the man you saw commit the terrible deed. The judge listens intently and respectfully, obviously more moved by this outpouring than by all the evidence presented by the prosecution. Is this not a nightmare? Would you be willing to live in such a land? Or would you be willing to be operated on by a surgeon you tells you that whenever a little voice in him tells him to disregard his medical training, he listens to the little voice? I know it passes in polite company to let people have it both ways, and under most circumstances I wholeheartedly cooperate with this benign agreement. But we're seriously trying to get at the truth here, and if you think that this common but unspoken understanding about faith is anything better than socially useful obfuscation to avoid mutual embarrassment and loss of face, you have either seen much more deeply into the issue that any philosopher ever has (for none has ever come up with a good defense of this) or you are kidding yourself.
    Daniel Dennett

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