What is another word for H. G. Wells?

Pronunciation: [ˈe͡ɪt͡ʃ] (IPA)

H. G. Wells was an English writer who left a lasting impact on the world of science fiction. He is perhaps best known for his novels "The War of the Worlds" and "The Time Machine". Wells was a prolific writer, and his works encompassed a wide range of genres, from social commentary to history. Synonyms for H. G. Wells might include visionary, futurist, author, or literary mastermind. His stories have inspired countless adaptations and have continued to captivate readers for over a century. Whether exploring the depths of human nature or imagining the possibilities of the universe, there's no denying H. G. Wells' influence on the world of literature.

Synonyms for H. g. wells:

What are the hypernyms for H. g. wells?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Famous quotes with H. g. wells

  • Later Julian would give me another book he had culled from among the Archival duplicates, a short novel called by Mr. H. G. Wells, about a marvelous but apparently imaginary cart which carried a man into the future—and it fascinated me—but the Archive itself was a Time Machine in everything but name. Here were voices preserved on browning paper like pressed flowers, whispering apostasies into the ear of a new century.
    Robert Charles Wilson
  • In fact, the real problem with the thesis of A Genealogy of Morals is that the noble and the aristocrat are just as likely to be stupid as the plebeian. I had noted in my teens that major writers are usually those who have had to struggle against the odds -- to "pull their cart out of the mud," as I put it -- while writers who have had an easy start in life are usually second rate -- or at least, not quite first-rate. Dickens, Balzac, Dostoevsky, Shaw, H. G. Wells, are examples of the first kind; in the twentieth century, John Galsworthy, Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh, and Samuel Beckett are examples of the second kind. They are far from being mediocre writers; yet they tend to be tinged with a certain pessimism that arises from never having achieved a certain resistance against problems.
    Evelyn Waugh
  • "He came into bloom too early." "He never could top it." Top what?! His first production on the stage in New York was a black in Harlem that set the early evening traffic of Manhattan moving one way — north — for as long as the Federal Theatre Project chose to run the play. He topped this with probably the most stylish French farce ever seen west of the Champs Élysées, and the topping for this was a production of that led to the opening of his own theatre, the Mercury, with a production of so vigorous, so contemporary that it set Broadway on its ear. But luckily, only one ear, for with the other it was listening and running scared with the rest of the country while O. Welles, in a Madison Avenue radio studio, was reading his adaptation of H. G. Wells's account of the Martian invasion of Earth.
    Orson Welles
  • In fact, the real problem with the thesis of A Genealogy of Morals is that the noble and the aristocrat are just as likely to be stupid as the plebeian. I had noted in my teens that major writers are usually those who have had to struggle against the odds — to "pull their cart out of the mud," as I put it — while writers who have had an easy start in life are usually second rate — or at least, not quite first-rate. Dickens, Balzac, Dostoevsky, Shaw, H. G. Wells, are examples of the first kind; in the twentieth century, John Galsworthy, Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh, and Samuel Beckett are examples of the second kind. They are far from being mediocre writers; yet they tend to be tinged with a certain pessimism that arises from never having achieved a certain resistance against problems.
    Samuel Beckett
  • In 1933, Einstein's works were among those burned in the book bonfires organized by the Nazis throughout Germany, together with those of such different anti-fascist writers as Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Freud, Proust, Hemingway, H. G. Wells, Gide, Upton Sinclair, etc.
    H. G. Wells

Related words: H.G. Wells books, H.G. Wells novels, H.G. Wells books list, H.G. Wells biography, who wrote War of the Worlds, who was H. G. Wells, H.G. Wells book list, H. G. Wells quotes

Related questions:

  • Who was h. g. wells?
  • Word of the Day

    getupandgo
    The term "getupandgo" refers to an individual's innate motivation to take action and accomplish goals. Its antonyms can be used to describe a person who lacks motivation or is gene...