What is another word for sixpence?

Pronunciation: [sˈɪkspəns] (IPA)

Sixpence is a historic British coin that is no longer in use. It was made of copper and had a value of six pennies. Some synonyms for sixpence include shilling, half crown, tanner, and ha'penny. A shilling was worth twelve pennies, while a half crown was worth two shillings and six pence. A tanner was slang for sixpence, and a ha'penny was half a penny, or a quarter of a sixpence. These coins were commonly used as currency in Britain in the past but have become obsolete over time. Synonyms for sixpence can be seen as relics of a bygone era, and they serve as a reminder of the evolution of money in modern times.

Synonyms for Sixpence:

What are the hypernyms for Sixpence?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Sixpence?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.
  • hyponyms for sixpence (as nouns)

Usage examples for Sixpence

The price of a lootje that is to say, the fee for entry was sixpence, and each could take as many lootjes as he liked.
"Reminiscences of a South African Pioneer"
W. C. Scully
"Here's your sixpence, Mary.
"Night and Day"
Virginia Woolf
Then he went to the little stock of money in his locked-up bag, and found there eight shillings and sixpence.
"The Beautiful Wretch; The Pupil of Aurelius; and The Four Macnicols"
William Black

Famous quotes with Sixpence

  • Beef also was difficult to be procured and exceedingly poor; the price nearly sixpence farthing per pound.
    William Bligh
  • Without the shepherd's dog, the whole of the open mountainous land in Scotland would not be worth a sixpence.
    James Hogg
  • A man who sees another man on the street corner with only a stump for an arm will be so shocked the first time he'll give him sixpence. But the second time it'll only be a three penny bit. And if he sees him a third time, he'll have him cold-bloodedly handed over to the police.
    Bertolt Brecht
  • There are various ways of flattering, and, of course, you must adapt your style to your subject. Some people like it laid on with a trowel, and this requires very little art. With sensible persons, however, it needs to be done very delicately, and more by suggestion than actual words. A good many like it wrapped up in the form of an insult, as—"Oh, you are a perfect fool, you are. You would give your last sixpence to the first hungry-looking beggar you met;" while others will swallow it only when administered through the medium of a third person, so that if C wishes to get at an A of this sort, he must confide to A's particular friend B that he thinks A a splendid fellow, and beg him, B, not to mention it, especially to A. Be careful that B is a reliable man, though, otherwise he won't.
    Jerome K. Jerome
  • No.3 Commando was very anxious to be chums with Lord Glasgow, so they offered to blow up an old tree stump for him and he was very grateful and said don't spoil the plantation of young trees near it because that is the apple of my eye and they said no of course not we can blow a tree down so it falls on a sixpence and Lord Glasgow said goodness you are clever and he asked them all to luncheon for the great explosion. So Col. Durnford-Slater DSO said to his subaltern, have you put enough explosive in the tree?. Yes, sir, 75lbs. Is that enough? Yes sir I worked it out by mathematics it is exactly right. Well better put a bit more. Very good sir. And when Col. D Slater DSO had had his port he sent for the subaltern and said subaltern better put a bit more explosive in that tree. I don't want to disappoint Lord Glasgow. Very good sir. Then they all went out to see the explosion and Col. DS DSO said you will see that tree fall flat at just the angle where it will hurt no young trees and Lord Glasgow said goodness you are clever. So soon they lit the fuse and waited for the explosion and presently the tree, instead of falling quietly sideways, rose 50 feet into the air taking with it ½ acre of soil and the whole young plantation. And the subaltern said Sir, I made a mistake, it should have been 7½ not 75. Lord Glasgow was so upset he walked in dead silence back to his castle and when they came to the turn of the drive in sight of his castle what should they find but that every pane of glass in the building was broken. So Lord Glasgow gave a little cry and ran to hide his emotions in the lavatory and there when he pulled the plug the entire ceiling, loosened by the explosion, fell on his head. This is quite true.
    Evelyn Waugh

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