What is another word for strombus?

Pronunciation: [stɹˈɒmbəs] (IPA)

Strombus is a genus of medium to large-sized sea snails, also commonly referred to as conch shells. The word "strombus" itself is taken from the Greek word "strombos," meaning twisted or curved. Synonyms for strombus include the term "conch," which is derived from the Latin word "concha," meaning shell, and "seashell." Other synonyms for strombus include the descriptive terms "spiral shell" and "whelk shell." The strombus shell is often valued for its intricate and beautiful patterns, making it a popular decorative item in home decor. Additionally, the strombus shell has been used for centuries in various cultures as a musical instrument, known as a conch trumpet.

Synonyms for Strombus:

What are the hypernyms for Strombus?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.
  • Other hypernyms:

    gastropod, mollusk, benthic organism.

What are the hyponyms for Strombus?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.

What are the holonyms for Strombus?

Holonyms are words that denote a whole whose part is denoted by another word.

What are the meronyms for Strombus?

Meronyms are words that refer to a part of something, where the whole is denoted by another word.
  • meronyms for strombus (as nouns)

Usage examples for Strombus

The huge strombus of San Vicente and Porto Santo, S. Italicus, is an extinct shell of the Sub-apennine or Older Pliocene formations.
"The Student's Elements of Geology"
Sir Charles Lyell
The rapid movements of a small strombus, which, when taken, beat about it with its shell, formed like a thin plate of horn, and armed with sharp teeth, were very curious.
"A New Voyage Round the World, in the years 1823, 24, 25, and 26, Vol. 2"
Otto von Kotzebue
1. strombus 60 W. Indies, Mediterranean, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, Pacific-low water to 10 fathoms.
"Sea-Weeds, Shells and Fossils"
Peter Gray B. B. Woodward

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