What is another word for Aborigines?

Pronunciation: [ˌabəɹˈɪd͡ʒənˌiz] (IPA)

The term "Aborigines" refers to the indigenous people of Australia, but it is now widely considered outdated and even offensive. There are several alternatives that are more respectful and accurate, including "First Nations" and "First Peoples." Other synonyms include "indigenous Australians," "Original Australians," "Native Australians," and "Torres Strait Islanders." These terms recognize the diversity and complexity of Australia's indigenous communities and their unique cultures and histories. It is important to use respectful and appropriate language when referring to any marginalized group, and this includes being mindful of their preferred terminology.

What are the paraphrases for Aborigines?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
Paraphrases are highlighted according to their relevancy:
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What are the hypernyms for Aborigines?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.
  • Other hypernyms:

    Native Americans, first nations, indigenous peoples, original inhabitants, original settlers.

Usage examples for Aborigines

Some thought he had fallen into the hands of the Aborigines who were closely watching us; and it was obvious that had they got possession of our sheep, they could have annoyed us very seriously, or indeed, destroyed the whole party.
"Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia In Search of a Route from Sydney to the Gulf of Carpentaria (1848) by Lt. Col. Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell Kt. D.C.L. (1792-1855) Surveyor-General of New South Wales"
Thomas Mitchell
Thus it is, that the Aborigines first become sensible of the approach of the white man.
"Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia In Search of a Route from Sydney to the Gulf of Carpentaria (1848) by Lt. Col. Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell Kt. D.C.L. (1792-1855) Surveyor-General of New South Wales"
Thomas Mitchell
We cannot occupy the land without producing a change, fully as great to the Aborigines, as that which took place on man's fall and expulsion from Eden.
"Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia In Search of a Route from Sydney to the Gulf of Carpentaria (1848) by Lt. Col. Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell Kt. D.C.L. (1792-1855) Surveyor-General of New South Wales"
Thomas Mitchell

Famous quotes with Aborigines

  • There were a couple Aborigines in my primary school, but we never spoke to them. They kept to themselves, and we never really even locked eyes. They weren't acknowledged officially either.
    Phillip Noyce
  • Do you still throw spears at each other? (to Australian Aborigines during a visit to Queensland)
    Prince Phillip
  • To some extent my generation was reared on the Three Cheers view of history. This patriotic view of our past had a long run. It saw Australian history as largely a success. While the convict era was a source of shame or unease, nearly everything that came after was believed to be pretty good. There is a rival view, which I call the Black Armband view of history. In recent years it has assailed the optimistic view of history. The black armbands were quietly worn in official circles in 1988. The multicultural folk busily preached their message that until they arrived much of Australian history was a disgrace. The past treatment of Aborigines, of Chinese, of Kanakas, of non-British migrants, of women, the very old, the very young, and the poor was singled out, sometimes legitimately, sometimes not. ... The Black Armband view of history might well represent the swing of the pendulum from a position that had been too favourable, too self congratulatory, to an opposite extreme that is even more unreal and decidedly jaundiced.
    Geoffrey Blainey
  • Could the Aboriginal and the British cultures have been reconciled when they first met? The prevailing view is that they could have signed a treaty and found a way of ­living together in relative ­harmony. I am not persuaded. The two confronting cultures, whether first living side by side at Sydney in 1788 or at Perth in 1829, had little in common except that they were the product of human beings. Their languages and religions differed. Their attitude to marriage, family, property and individual wealth, their economic and political systems, their way of fighting, and their thoughts about life and death, were far apart. In the world today no two cultures are so far apart as those that lived side by side in many Australian regions after 1788. Mecca and ­Washington today have far more in common than did the paternal ­Governor Phillip and the Aborigines whom he met in Sydney in 1788.
    Geoffrey Blainey
  • The eclipse of the Aborigines was tragic. Could it have been averted? It could have been prevented for a time if no British settlers had landed, but eventually people of other European or Asian nations would have come and occupied much of the land.
    Geoffrey Blainey

Word of the Day

being sweet on
Synonyms:
abide by, accept, acclaim, accolade, accredit, acknowledgment, admiration, adoration, alike, animate.