What is another word for frame in?

6 synonyms found

Pronunciation:

[ fɹˈe͡ɪm ˈɪn], [ fɹˈe‍ɪm ˈɪn], [ f_ɹ_ˈeɪ_m ˈɪ_n]

The term "frame in" refers to the act of enclosing something within a frame. There are several synonyms for this phrase, such as "encase," "surround," "enclose," "contain," "encircle," and "border." Each of these terms refers to the act of enclosing something within a defined space. For example, when an artist is "framing in" a painting, they might use any of these synonyms to describe the process of creating a boundary around the artwork. Similarly, an engineer might "frame in" a machine or piece of equipment by designing an enclosure that contains it, which might be referred to as "enclosure," "surround," or "outer casing".

Synonyms for Frame in:

What are the hypernyms for Frame in?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Famous quotes with Frame in

  • For all that Nature by her mother-wit Could frame in earth.
    Edmund Spenser
  • There are few works which have had an equal influence on literature with the of Boccaccio. Even in England its effects were powerful. From it Chaucer adopted the notion of the frame in which he has enclosed his tales, and the general manner of his stories, while in some instances, as we have seen, be has merely versified the novels of the Italian. In 1566, William Paynter printed many of Boccaccio's stories in English, in his work called the . The first translation contained sixty novels, and it was soon followed by another volume, comprehending thirty-four additional tales. These are the pages of which Shakespeare made so much use. From Burton's , we learn that one of the great amusements of our ancestors was reading Boccaccio aloud, an entertainment of which the effects were speedily visible in the literature of the country. The first English translation, however, of the whole , did not appear till 1620. In France, Boccaccio found early and illustrious imitators. In his own country he brought his native tongue to perfection, and gave stability to a mode of composition, which before his time had only existed in a rude state in Italy; be collected the current tales of the age, which he decorated with new circumstances, and delivered in a style which has no parallel for elegance, naivete, and grace. Hence his popularity was unbounded, and his imitators more numerous than those of any author recorded in the annals of literature.
    Giovanni Boccaccio

Word of the Day

united action
Synonyms:
Pooling.