What is another word for doyly?

3 synonyms found

Pronunciation:

[ dˈɔ͡ɪli], [ dˈɔ‍ɪli], [ d_ˈɔɪ_l_i]

Doyly is a term that refers to a small piece of ornamental mat or cloth used for covering a serving dish. While doylys are commonly known for their use in formal table settings, they are not the only term used to refer to these items. One of the synonyms for doyly is a "dish mat," which is more direct and is used to describe an item that is placed under a dish to protect the table from any spills or food stains. Other synonyms include "plate mat," "coaster," and "placemat." Each term refers to the same small piece of material, but each has its own distinctive connotations that may be more appropriate for different contexts.

Synonyms for Doyly:

  • n.

    doily doyley
  • Other relevant words:

    Other relevant words (noun):

What are the hypernyms for Doyly?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Usage examples for Doyly

doyly to Chatham to pay off a ship there.
"Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete Transcribed From The Shorthand Manuscript In The Pepysian Library Magdalene College Cambridge By The Rev. Mynors Bright"
Samuel Pepys Commentator: Lord Braybrooke
Rained all the afternoon and evening, so as my letters being done, I was forced to get a bed at Captain Cocke's, where I find Sir W. doyly, and he, and Evelyn at supper; and I with them full of discourse of the neglect of our masters, the great officers of State, about all business, and especially that of money: having now some thousands prisoners, kept to no purpose at a great charge, and no money provided almost for the doing of it.
"Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete Transcribed From The Shorthand Manuscript In The Pepysian Library Magdalene College Cambridge By The Rev. Mynors Bright"
Samuel Pepys Commentator: Lord Braybrooke
Up and walked to the office, there to do some business till ten of the clock, and then by agreement my Lord, Sir J. Minnes, Sir W. doyly, and I took boat and over to the ferry, where Sir W. Batten's coach was ready for us, and to Walthamstow drove merrily, excellent merry discourse in the way, and most upon our last night's revells; there come we were very merry, and a good plain venison dinner.
"Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete Transcribed From The Shorthand Manuscript In The Pepysian Library Magdalene College Cambridge By The Rev. Mynors Bright"
Samuel Pepys Commentator: Lord Braybrooke

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