What is another word for linen?

Pronunciation: [lˈɪnɪn] (IPA)

Synonyms for the word "linen" include fabric, cloth, cotton, silk, hemp, and flax. Linen is a versatile material that has been used for hundreds of years for clothing, bedding, and household items. Its properties include breathability, durability, and absorbency. Cotton is a popular alternative to linen as it possesses similar qualities and can be less expensive. Silk is a highly sought after luxury fabric due to its softness and sheen. Hemp and flax are both sustainable alternatives to linen and are also known for their strength and durability. Whether for fashion or function, these synonyms for linen offer a variety of options for any project.

Synonyms for Linen:

What are the paraphrases for Linen?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
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What are the hypernyms for Linen?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Linen?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.

What are the meronyms for Linen?

Meronyms are words that refer to a part of something, where the whole is denoted by another word.
  • meronyms for linen (as nouns)

Usage examples for Linen

Antrim was just beginning to get accustomed to my new habiliments of boots, boiled linen and hat when I left to "push my fortune" in other parts.
"My Lady of the Chimney Corner"
Alexander Irvine
The prisoners carried, wrapped in linen, the bodies of the newly dead to bury them in the sand beyond the city, where the real charge of the funeral was assumed by hyenas.
"In Desert and Wilderness"
Henryk Sienkiewicz
The linen walls now did not afford any shelter.
"In Desert and Wilderness"
Henryk Sienkiewicz

Famous quotes with Linen

  • But whether, for example, a coat can be exchanged for twenty yards of linen cloth or for forty yards is not a matter of chance, but depends upon objective conditions, upon the amount of socially necessary labor time contained in the coat and in the linen respectively.
    Rudolf Hiferding
  • And in that line now was a whiskered old man, with a linen cap and a crooked nose, who waited in a place called the Stardust Band Shell to share his part of the secret of heaven: that each affects the other and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one.
    Mitch Albom
  • The Egyptians had a particularly nasty way of getting rid of people they felt had no consequence. Instead of embalming them, they simply constructed a fake mummy made from old strips of linen wrapped around a dummy of mud. If, in our modern world, you feel that there are a lot of “mud mummies” around you, get rid of the mud.
    Perry Brass
  • You know what futurists and online-ists and cut-out-the-middle-man-ists and Davos-ists and deconstructionists of every stripe want for themselves? They want exactly what they tell you you no longer need, you pathetic, overweight, disembodied Kindle reader. They want white linen tablecloths on trestle tables in the middle of vineyards on soft blowy afternoons. (You can click your bottle of wine online. Cheaper.) They want to go shopping on Saturday afternoons on the Avenue Victor Hugo; they want the pages of their New York Times all kind of greasy from croissant crumbs and butter at a café table in Aspen; they want to see their names in hard copy in the “New Establishment” issue of Vanity Fair; they want a nineteenth-century bookshop; they want to see the plays in London, they want to float down the Nile in a felucca; they want five-star bricks and mortar and do not disturb signs and views of the park. And in order to reserve these things for themselves they will plug up your eyes and your ears and your mouth, and if they can figure out a way to pump episodes of The Simpsons through the darkening corridors of your brain as you expire (ADD TO SHOPPING CART), they will do it.
    Richard Rodriguez
  • Something funny I have noticed—perhaps you have noticed it, too. You know what futurists and online-ists and cut-out-the-middle-man-ists and Davos-ists and deconstructionists of every stripe want for themselves? They want exactly what they tell you you no longer need, you pathetic, overweight, disembodied Kindle reader. They want white linen tablecloths on trestle tables in the middle of vineyards on soft blowy afternoons. (You can click your bottle of wine online. Cheaper.) They want to go shopping on Saturday afternoons on the Avenue Victor Hugo; they want the pages of their all kind of greasy from croissant crumbs and butter at a café table in Aspen; they want to see their names in hard copy in the “New Establishment” issue of ; they want a nineteenth-century bookshop; they want to see the plays in London; they want to float down the Nile in a felucca; they want five-star bricks and mortar and Do Not Disturb signs and views of the park. And in order to reserve these things for themselves they will plug up your eyes and your ears and your mouth, and if they can figure out a way to pump episodes of through the darkening corridors of your brain as you expire (ADD TO SHOPPING CART), they will do it.
    Richard Rodriguez

Related words: linen napkins, white linen, linen sheets, linen tablecloth, linen shirts, linen dishes, linen pillowcases, linen pillow covers

Related questions:

  • Where can i buy linen?
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