What is another word for play actor?

Pronunciation: [plˈe͡ɪ ˈaktə] (IPA)

The term "play actor" can also be referred to as an "actor," "performer," or "stage player." Another synonym is "thespian," which comes from the ancient Greek theatre and refers to someone who acted on stage. Some other options include "dramatist," "entertainer," "player," "artist," and "role-player." Depending on the context, one might use "star," "lead," "supporting actor," "extra," or "character actor." In addition to these terms, there are also various job titles and descriptions within the entertainment industry, including "stunt double," "voice actor," and "background actor." Each of these terms highlights a unique aspect of the craft of acting and performing on stage or screen.

What are the hypernyms for Play actor?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the opposite words for play actor?

The antonyms for "play actor" include serious, sincere, genuine, and honest. Unlike play actors, serious individuals are ones who approach work with diligence and commitment, often resulting in better outcomes. Sincere individuals show an honest and genuine interest in their endeavors and are usually motivated by their beliefs and values. Genuine individuals are authentic and display a sincere interest in the people and situations around them. Conversely, play actors tend to be manipulative, superficial, and insincere in their pursuit of attention and success. Overall, the antonyms of play actor reflect individuals that are more authentic and committed to their actions, making them more trustworthy and respected in their endeavors.

What are the antonyms for Play actor?

Famous quotes with Play actor

  • "I suppose he had the good luck to be executed, no? I had an hour's chat with him in Buenos Aires. He struck me as a kind of play actor, no? Living up to a certain role. I mean, being a professional Andalusian... But in the case of Lorca, it was very strange because I lived in Andalusia and the Andalusians aren't a bit like that. His were stage Andalusians. Maybe he thought that in Buenos Aires he had to live up to that character, but in Andalusia, people are not like that. In fact, if you are in Andalusia, if you are talking to a man of letters and you speak to him about bullfights, he'll say, 'Oh well, that sort of this pleases people, I suppose, but really the torero works in no danger whatsoever. Because they are bored by these things, because every writer is bored by the local color in his own country. Well, when I met Lorca, he was being a professional Andalusian... Besides, Lorca wanted to astonish us. He said to me that he was very troubled about a very important figure in the contemporary world. A character in whom he could see all the tragedy of American life. And then he went on in this way until I asked him who was this character and it turned out this character was Mickey Mouse. I suppose he was trying to be clever. And I thought, 'That's the kind of thing you say when you are very, very young and you want to astonish somebody.' But after all, he was a grown man, he had no need, he could have talked in a different way. But when he started in about Mickey Mouse being a symbol of America, there was a friend of mine there and he looked at me and I looked at him and we both walked away because we were too old for that kind of game, no? Even at that time."
    Jorge Luis Borges
  • I suppose he had the good luck to be executed, no? I had an hour's chat with him in Buenos Aires. He struck me as a kind of play actor, no? Living up to a certain role. I mean, being a professional Andalusian... But in the case of Lorca, it was very strange because I lived in Andalusia and the Andalusians aren't a bit like that. His were stage Andalusians. Maybe he thought that in Buenos Aires he had to live up to that character, but in Andalusia, people are not like that. In fact, if you are in Andalusia, if you are talking to a man of letters and you speak to him about bullfights, he'll say, 'Oh well, that sort of this pleases people, I suppose, but really the torero works in no danger whatsoever.' Because they are bored by these things, because every writer is bored by the local color in his own country. Well, when I met Lorca, he was being a professional Andalusian... Besides, Lorca wanted to astonish us. He said to me that he was very troubled about a very important figure in the contemporary world. A character in whom he could see all the tragedy of American life. And then he went on in this way until I asked him who was this character and it turned out this character was Mickey Mouse. I suppose he was trying to be clever. And I thought, 'That's the kind of thing you say when you are very, very young and you want to astonish somebody.' But after all, he was a grown man, he had no need, he could have talked in a different way. But when he started in about Mickey Mouse being a symbol of America, there was a friend of mine there and he looked at me and I looked at him and we both walked away because we were too old for that kind of game, no? Even at that time.
    Federico García Lorca

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