What is another word for moans?

Pronunciation: [mˈə͡ʊnz] (IPA)

When it comes to expressing dissatisfaction or discomfort, the word "moans" might come to mind. However, there are plenty of synonyms that can add a bit more variety and depth to your vocabulary. Some options include "groans," "whimpers," "whines," "sighs," "complains," "bemoans," and "laments." Each of these options carries a slightly different connotation, so depending on the situation and tone, one might be more fitting than others. For instance, "groans" might be used to describe someone in physical pain, while "bemoans" might be more appropriate for someone expressing sorrow or regret. Whatever the context, knowing a range of synonyms for "moans" can help you more fully express yourself in your writing or speech.

What are the paraphrases for Moans?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
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  • Reverse Entailment

    • Proper noun, singular
      groans.
    • Verb, 3rd person singular present
      groans.
  • Independent

    • Proper noun, singular
      SLGHS.
    • Verb, 3rd person singular present
      snarls.
  • Other Related

    • Proper noun, singular
      sighs.

What are the hypernyms for Moans?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Usage examples for Moans

Her story was told in chants and moans.
"My Attainment of the Pole"
Frederick A. Cook
From the distance, softly shuddered the decreasing moans of the dying man; then there was silence.
"My Attainment of the Pole"
Frederick A. Cook
He is haggard and seems in great pain, for occasionally he moans.
"Contemporary One-Act Plays Compiler: B. Roland Lewis"
Sir James M. Barrie George Middleton Althea Thurston Percy Mackaye Lady Augusta Gregor Eugene Pillot Anton Tchekov Bosworth Crocker Alfred Kreymborg Paul Greene Arthur Hopkins Paul Hervieu Jeannette Marks Oscar M. Wolff David Pinski Beulah Bornstead Herma

Famous quotes with Moans

  • The ocean moans over dead men's bones.
    Thomas Bailey Aldrich
  • That man's best works should be such bungling imitations of Nature's infinite perfection, matters not much; but that he should make himself an imitation, this is the fact which Nature moans over, and deprecates beseechingly. Be spontaneous, be truthful, be free, and thus be individuals! is the song she sings through warbling birds, and whispering pines, and roaring waves, and screeching winds.
    Lydia Child
  • Hidden in hollows and behind clumps of rank brambles were large tents, dimly lighted with candles, but looking comfortable. The kind of comfort they supplied was indicated by pairs of men entering and reappearing, bearing litters; by low moans from within and by long rows of dead with covered faces outside. These tents were constantly receiving the wounded, yet were never full; they were continually ejecting the dead, yet were never empty. It was as if the helpless had been carried in and murdered, that they might not hamper those whose business it was to fall to-morrow.
    Ambrose Bierce
  • The earth cracks and is shriveled up; the wind moans piteously; the sky goes out if you should fail.
    William Carlos Williams
  • It was a day of gloom, and strange suspense, And feverish, and inexplicable dread, In Herculaneum's walls. The heavy, thick, And torrid atmosphere; the solid, vast, And strong--edg'd clouds, that through the firmament In various and opposing courses moved:-- The wild scream of the solitary bird That, at long intervals, flew terror-driven On high:--the howling of the red-ey'd dog As he gaz'd trembling on the angry heavens:- The hollow moans that swept along the air, Though every wind was lock'd,-portended all That nature with some dire event was big, And labour'd in its birth.
    Edwin Atherstone

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