What is another word for summarily?

Pronunciation: [sʌmˈɛɹəlɪ] (IPA)

Summarily is an adverb that means to do something in a brief and concise manner. Some synonyms for summarily include immediately, hastily, quickly, rapidly, briefly, succinctly, shortly, briefly, and curtly. Additionally, abruptly, suddenly, and swiftly can also be considered synonyms for summarily, as they all convey the idea of doing something in a decisive and swift manner. These synonyms are often used to describe actions that are taken without warning and require quick decisions to be made. Choosing the right synonym for summarily depends on the context of the situation and the emphasis that you want to place on the action being taken.

Synonyms for Summarily:

What are the paraphrases for Summarily?

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What are the hypernyms for Summarily?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the opposite words for summarily?

Summarily is an adverb used to describe the quick, concise and abrupt manner of doing something. Its antonyms would be words describing actions that are slow, lengthy and detailed. Words like extensively, extensively or elaborately could be used to categorize the opposite of summarily.  Another antonym for summarily could be gradually, which means doing things slowly but steadily over time. People can also use words like gradually, thoroughly, leisurely and unhurried to describe an action that is done in an unhurried, detailed and comprehensive manner rather than quickly or abruptly.

What are the antonyms for Summarily?

Usage examples for Summarily

Insubordinate army officers were summarily punished for injudicious remarks, but in order to appear neutral and to avoid criticism, the Cabinet held so much aloof that the anti-Dreyfusites were able to bring their full forces to bear on the court-martial.
"A History of the Third French Republic"
C. H. C. Wright
This matter was of too serious a nature to be hastily decided; but, while I was yet hesitating, an event took place which summarily decided it for me.
"A Lady's Captivity among Chinese Pirates in the Chinese Seas"
Fanny Loviot
As a result of all this, several near-Administration measures had been killed summarily, and apparently for no particularly good reason.
"Epistles-from-Pap-Letters-from-the-man-known-as-The-Will-Rogers-of-Indiana"
Durham, Andrew Everett

Famous quotes with Summarily

  • The parity pushers fail to see the subtle grays of complexity in all of its tortured and messy manifestations. With swords held high, they ride forth and exploit every possible weapon in the political arsenal. Equality is to be imposed, unevenness and nonlinearity banished to the nether world. Science is politicalized for mass consumption, and natural laws are summarily supplanted by ideological 'correctness.'
    L. K. Samuels
  • Mark Satin's irritating is a timely clue to what gave liberalism a bad name. It opens breathlessly. ... Satin ... perceive[s] obvious solutions to almost everything. The greater part of the book consists of short chapters that state daunting problems and then summarily solve them. ... Why do so many liberal preachments grate like glass shards on a blackboard? Well, maybe it's the tone, the disdain of politics, the smug armchair analyses, the insufferable smart-aleckness.
    Mark Satin
  • But while at the bottom of the national life the slime was thus constantly accumulating more and more deleteriously and deeply, so much the more smooth and glittering was the surface, overlaid with the varnish of polished manners and universal friendship. All the world interchanged visits; so that in the houses of quality it was necessary to admit the persons presenting themselves every morning for the levee in a certain order fixed by the master or occasionally by the attendant in waiting, and to give audience only to the more notable one by one, while the rest were more summarily admitted partly in groups, partly en masse at the close—a distinction which Gaius Gracchus, in this too paving the way for the new monarchy, is said to have introduced. The interchange of letters of courtesy was carried to as great an extent as the visits of courtesy; "friendly" letters flew over land and sea between persons who had neither personal relations nor business with each other, whereas proper and formal business-letters scarcely occur except where the letter is addressed to a corporation. In like manner invitations to dinner, the customary new year's presents, the domestic festivals, were divested of their proper character and converted almost into public ceremonials; even death itself did not release the Roman from these attentions to his countless "neighbours," but in order to die with due respectability he had to provide each of them at any rate with a keepsake. Just as in certain circles of our mercantile world, the genuine intimacy of family ties and family friendships had so totally vanished from the Rome of that day that the whole intercourse of business and acquaintance could be garnished with forms and flourishes which had lost all meaning, and thus by degrees the reality came to be superseded by that spectral shadow of "friendship," which holds by no means the least place among the various evil spirits brooding over the proscriptions and civil wars of this age.
    Theodor Mommsen

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