What is another word for injudiciousness?

97 synonyms found

Pronunciation:

[ ɪnd͡ʒuːdˈɪʃəsnəs], [ ɪnd‍ʒuːdˈɪʃəsnəs], [ ɪ_n_dʒ_uː_d_ˈɪ_ʃ_ə_s_n_ə_s]

Injudiciousness refers to the lack of good judgment or wisdom in decision-making or actions. Synonyms for this word include imprudence, recklessness, thoughtlessness, impulsiveness, indiscretion, carelessness, and foolishness. Other alternative words that can be used to describe the same meaning are inadvisability, unwise, impolitic, unsound, ill-considered, irrational, and hasty. These words describe a person or action that is deemed risky or harmful because of a lack of caution and foresight. Injudiciousness can lead to unfortunate consequences or regrettable outcomes. Using synonyms to describe it highlights the importance of making wise decisions and being responsible with one's actions.

What are the hypernyms for Injudiciousness?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the opposite words for injudiciousness?

Injudiciousness is the state of being foolish, unwise, or imprudent. Its antonyms would therefore be wise, sensible, and prudent. A wise person is someone who is knowledgeable and makes sensible decisions based on their understanding of the situation. Sensible people are the ones who have sound judgment, while prudent people are cautious and considerate in their decision-making. These traits are essential in a person's daily life, whether in their personal or professional life, and will always be vital in achieving success. In summary, using antonyms of injudiciousness such as wisdom, sensibleness, and prudence ensures that one's decision-making is guided by a sound mind for positive results.

What are the antonyms for Injudiciousness?

Usage examples for Injudiciousness

The injudiciousness of parents, a youth's own inexperience, or the absence of external opportunities for the congenial vocation, and their presence for an uncongenial, condemn numbers of men to pass their lives in doing one thing reluctantly and ill, when there are other things which they could have done well and happily.
"The Subjection of Women"
John Stuart Mill
The extreme injudiciousness of repeating these will be at once apparent, when we reflect on the unsatisfactory discussions which they too frequently occasion, and on the load of advice which they are the cause of being tendered, and which is, too often, of a kind neither to be useful nor agreeable.
"The Book of Household Management"
Mrs. Isabella Beeton
The same injudiciousness which crops out in a conference of churches this week will reappear in a town-meeting next week, and in a mass-meeting the week after, and a teachers'-meeting the week after that.
"A New Atmosphere"
Gail Hamilton

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