What is another word for meniscus?

Pronunciation: [mˈɛnɪskəs] (IPA)

Meniscus is a term most commonly associated with the concave or convex shape of water seen in a container. However, when referring to medical terms, it usually pertains to a disk of cartilage that serves as cushioning support. There are various synonyms for meniscus, including crescent, disc, pad, plate, or cartilage. Other related words include fibrocartilage, joint cushion, shock absorber, among others. While meniscus is often a medical term, it can also be related to physics and chemistry, referring to the curve formed at the surface of a liquid in a container, which can be referred to as a concave, convex or curved surface.

What are the hypernyms for Meniscus?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Meniscus?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.

Usage examples for Meniscus

The tendon of the popliteus muscle intervenes between the lateral meniscus and the capsule.
"Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities--Head--Neck. Sixth Edition."
Alexander Miles Alexis Thomson
Attempts may be made to retain the meniscus in position by pads, bandages, or other forms of apparatus, so arranged as to prevent rotation and side-to-side movement at the knee.
"Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities--Head--Neck. Sixth Edition."
Alexander Miles Alexis Thomson
In one case we found the meniscus separated at both ends and lying between the bones and the capsule.
"Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities--Head--Neck. Sixth Edition."
Alexander Miles Alexis Thomson

Famous quotes with Meniscus

  • When you speak with a Scientist about the glass being half-full and half-empty, she/he says that it's a SWAG (Scientific Wild Assumption Guess) based on only visual observation but not substantiated by any experimental data; and therefore it must be inaccurate. She/he will suggest that you do the following: (a) mark the glass at the bottom of the meniscus of the content, (b) pour the content into a bigger glass, (c) fill the empty glass with fresh content up to the mark, (d) add the original content back in, (e) note whether or not the combined content overflows the lip of the glass, (f) conclude that either the glass was more than half full if it overflows, or it was more than half-empty if it doesn't reach the top, (g) conclude that it was either half-full or half-empty only if it neither overflows nor fails to reach the top. Just a word of caution: Don't be surprised if the scientist, doesn't matter she or he, after all that "scientific discussion" asks you: "Now, what was your question again?
    Deodatta V. Shenai-Khatkhate
  • When you speak with a Scientist about the glass being half-full and half-empty, she/he says that it's a SWAG (Scientific Wild Assumption Guess) based on only visual observation but not substantiated by any experimental data; and therefore it must be inaccurate. She/he will suggests that you (a) mark the glass at the bottom of the meniscus of the content, (b) pour the content into a bigger glass, (c) fill the empty glass with fresh content up to the mark, (d) add the original content back in, (e) note whether or not the combined content overflows the lip of the glass, (f) conclude that either the glass was more than half full if it overflows, or it was more than half-empty if it doesn't reach the top, (g) conclude that it was either half-full or half-empty only if it neither overflows nor fails to reach the top. Just a word of caution: Don't be surprised if the scientist, doesn't matter she or he, after all that "discussion" asks you "Now, what was your question again?
    Deodatta V. Shenai-Khatkhate

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