What is another word for self-assured?

Pronunciation: [sˈɛlfəʃjˈʊ͡əd] (IPA)

Self-assured is a confident and assertive term that can be used to describe someone who is sure of their abilities, actions, and opinions. Some synonyms of this word include self-confident, assured, composed, poised, self-possessed, confident, self-reliant, and self-sufficient. All these words portray the concept of being confident in oneself and one's abilities. A self-assured person is someone who is sure of their decisions and can take charge of a situation, showing confidence and poise even in challenging situations. These synonyms can be used interchangeably with self-assured depending on the context and tone of the sentence.

Synonyms for Self-assured:

What are the paraphrases for Self-assured?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
Paraphrases are highlighted according to their relevancy:
- highest relevancy
- medium relevancy
- lowest relevancy

What are the hypernyms for Self-assured?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the opposite words for self-assured?

Self-assured is a term used to describe someone who is confident, composed, and assured in their own abilities. Antonyms of the term self-assured include hesitant, unsure, tentative, indecisive, uncertain, and apprehensive. As the opposite of self-assured, these words suggest a lack of confidence in one's own abilities or decisions. A person who is hesitant or unsure may be perceived as being timid or lacking in self-esteem. Someone who is tentative in their actions may be seen as being indecisive or uncertain about their choices. Similarly, an apprehensive individual may be viewed as being overly cautious or fearful.

Famous quotes with Self-assured

  • I am a woman of the 21st Century who is self-assured and speaks my mind.
    Ednita Nazario
  • A Frenchman is self-assured because he regards himself personally both in mind and body as irresistibly attractive to men and women. An Englishman is self-assured as being a citizen of the best-organized state in the world and therefore, as an Englishman, always knows what he should do and knows that all he does as an Englishman is undoubtedly correct. An Italian is self-assured because he is excitable and easily forgets himself and other people. A Russian is self-assured just because he knows nothing and does not want to know anything, since he does not believe that anything can be known. The German's self-assurance is worst of all, stronger and more repulsive than any other, because he imagines that he knows the truth -- science -- which he himself has invented but which is for him the absolute truth.
    Leo Tolstoy
  • Self-confidence/assurance is simply all about being on a firm ground i.e. self-confidence/assurance is all about being 100% assured/confident of your self/potential/skill/ability/belief. Now that infers, whoever that is not assured/confident of his/her potential/skill/ability/belief is never self-confident/assured. So, dare to be self-assured/confident if you've not been self-confident/assured.
    Emeasoba George
  • A Frenchman is self-assured because he regards himself personally, both in mind and body, as irresistibly attractive to men and women. An Englishman is self-assured, as being a citizen of the best-organized state in the world, and therefore as an Englishman always knows what he should do and knows that all he does as an Englishman is undoubtedly correct. An Italian is self-assured because he is excitable and easily forgets himself and other people. A Russian is self-assured just because he knows nothing and does not want to know anything, since he does not believe that anything can be known. The German's self-assurance is worst of all, stronger and more repulsive than any other, because he imagines that he knows the truth — science — which he himself has invented but which is for him the absolute truth.
    Leo Tolstoy

Word of the Day

Cortical Blindness
Cortical blindness is a term used to describe the loss of vision resulting from damage to the visual cortex of the brain. In contrast, the antonyms for cortical blindness refer to ...