What is another word for bookshop?

Pronunciation: [bˈʊkʃɒp] (IPA)

A bookshop is a retail store that specializes in selling books. However, there are many other synonyms for this type of business. One popular term is bookstore, which is commonly used in North America. Another term is book emporium, which suggests a large and prestigious bookstore. A more casual term is book nook, which implies a small and cozy store. Other synonyms include bookstall, book depot, and reading room. There are also more specific terms, such as a comic book store or a children's bookstore. No matter what word you use, bookshops are integral to the literary community and provide a haven for book lovers everywhere.

Synonyms for Bookshop:

What are the paraphrases for Bookshop?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
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What are the hypernyms for Bookshop?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Bookshop?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.
  • hyponyms for bookshop (as nouns)

Usage examples for Bookshop

I have a friend-he has a bookshop there.
"Fortitude"
Hugh Walpole
Then I find you-I love you as my son and I say 'Come to my bookshop'-But only ze bookshop mind you-you are there for ze books and because I care for you-I care for you ver' much, Peter, and zere 'as not been room in my life for ze affections ...
"Fortitude"
Hugh Walpole
One strange thing was the number of people that came into the bookshop with no intention whatever of having anything to do with the books.
"Fortitude"
Hugh Walpole

Famous quotes with Bookshop

  • I'm addicted to email, but other than that, there are practical things - being able to buy a book on the internet that you can't find in your local bookshop. This could be a lifeline if you live further from the sources.
    Marilyn Hacker
  • A good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.
    Terry Pratchett
  • You know what futurists and online-ists and cut-out-the-middle-man-ists and Davos-ists and deconstructionists of every stripe want for themselves? They want exactly what they tell you you no longer need, you pathetic, overweight, disembodied Kindle reader. They want white linen tablecloths on trestle tables in the middle of vineyards on soft blowy afternoons. (You can click your bottle of wine online. Cheaper.) They want to go shopping on Saturday afternoons on the Avenue Victor Hugo; they want the pages of their New York Times all kind of greasy from croissant crumbs and butter at a café table in Aspen; they want to see their names in hard copy in the “New Establishment” issue of Vanity Fair; they want a nineteenth-century bookshop; they want to see the plays in London, they want to float down the Nile in a felucca; they want five-star bricks and mortar and do not disturb signs and views of the park. And in order to reserve these things for themselves they will plug up your eyes and your ears and your mouth, and if they can figure out a way to pump episodes of The Simpsons through the darkening corridors of your brain as you expire (ADD TO SHOPPING CART), they will do it.
    Richard Rodriguez
  • Something funny I have noticed—perhaps you have noticed it, too. You know what futurists and online-ists and cut-out-the-middle-man-ists and Davos-ists and deconstructionists of every stripe want for themselves? They want exactly what they tell you you no longer need, you pathetic, overweight, disembodied Kindle reader. They want white linen tablecloths on trestle tables in the middle of vineyards on soft blowy afternoons. (You can click your bottle of wine online. Cheaper.) They want to go shopping on Saturday afternoons on the Avenue Victor Hugo; they want the pages of their all kind of greasy from croissant crumbs and butter at a café table in Aspen; they want to see their names in hard copy in the “New Establishment” issue of ; they want a nineteenth-century bookshop; they want to see the plays in London; they want to float down the Nile in a felucca; they want five-star bricks and mortar and Do Not Disturb signs and views of the park. And in order to reserve these things for themselves they will plug up your eyes and your ears and your mouth, and if they can figure out a way to pump episodes of through the darkening corridors of your brain as you expire (ADD TO SHOPPING CART), they will do it.
    Richard Rodriguez
  • [On libraries] What's great about them is that anybody can go into them and find a book and borrow it free of charge and read it. They don't have to steal it from a bookshop... You know when you're young, you're growing up, they're almost sexually exciting places because books are powerhouses of knowledge, and therefore they're kind of slightly dark and dangerous. You see books that kind of make you go 'Oh!'
    Stephen Fry

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