What is another word for overcoats?

Pronunciation: [ˈə͡ʊvəkˌə͡ʊts] (IPA)

Overcoats, also known as topcoats, are an essential wardrobe staple during the colder months. These garments are designed to provide warmth and protection from the elements, while adding a touch of sophistication to any outfit. While some people may refer to them as jackets or coats, there are a number of other synonyms for overcoats that can also be used, including greatcoats, peacoats, trench coats, and duffle coats. Each of these options has a distinct style, length, and fabric, allowing wearers to choose the perfect overcoat to suit their needs and personal style. No matter what you call them, overcoats are a timeless fashion statement that will never go out of style.

What are the paraphrases for Overcoats?

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What are the hypernyms for Overcoats?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Usage examples for Overcoats

It was about half-past eleven, and the station was unusually quiet; a few passengers, in wraps and overcoats, were walking to and fro, waiting for the last train, and one or two porters were standing about yawning.
"Liza of Lambeth"
W. Somerset Maugham
A good three hours later I was following the gardener downstairs, the dead body of Nous, wrapped completely in one of my overcoats, in my arms.
"To-morrow?"
Victoria Cross
The bags were distributed by a number of men wearing the dark overcoats and uniform caps of the Salvation Army!
"The Sins of Séverac Bablon"
Sax Rohmer

Famous quotes with Overcoats

  • I remember wearing overcoats, hiding in the bushes outside of Abbey Road Studios, waiting for the traffic to clear. As it did, we would drop our overcoats and run out on to the cross walk and strike our poses.
    Jack Irons
  • So to sleep on the sleeping porch required preparation. First, you put on long underwear, pajamas, jeans, a sweatshirt, your grandfather’s old cardigan and bathrobe, two pairs of woolen socks on your feet and another on your hands, and a hat with earflaps tied beneath the chin.Then you climbed into bed and were immediately covered with a dozen bed blankets, three horse blankets, all the household overcoats, a canvas tarpaulin, and a piece of old carpet. I’m not sure that they didn’t lay an old wardrobe on top of that, just to hold everything down. It was like sleeping under a dead horse. For the first minute or so it was unimaginably cold, shockingly cold, but gradually your body heat seeped in and you became warm and happy in a way you would not have believed possible only a minute or two before. It was bliss. Or at least it was until you moved a muscle. The warmth, you discovered, extended only to the edge of your skin and not a micron farther. There wasn’t any possibility of shifting positions. If you so much as flexed a finger or bent a knee, it was like plunging them into liquid nitrogen.
    Bill Bryson
  • Suppose a clothing manufacturer learns of a machine that will make men’s and women's overcoats for half as much labor as previously. He installs the machines and drops half his labor force.
    Henry Hazlitt

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