What is another word for lesion?

Pronunciation: [lˈiːʒən] (IPA)

A lesion is an abnormality or injury within the body that can impact organs, tissues, or cells. There are various synonyms for this term that can be used depending on the specific situation. Some possible substitutes for lesion include: injury, wound, sore, ulcer, tumor, growth, lump, swelling, abscess, and cyst. These words can be used interchangeably with lesion when describing a medical condition or affliction. It is important to choose the correct term for each situation to ensure clear and accurate communication. The use of synonyms can enhance the descriptive power of medical language and help to convey important details to patients and healthcare professionals alike.

Synonyms for Lesion:

What are the paraphrases for Lesion?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
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  • Equivalence

    • Noun, singular or mass
      wound.
  • Other Related

    • Noun, singular or mass
      damage.

What are the hypernyms for Lesion?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Lesion?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.
  • hyponyms for lesion (as nouns)

Usage examples for Lesion

The fact was that the strain of the two days' climb had caused a valvular lesion that was irreparable, although not great enough seriously to curtail his activities if he had given heed to his general condition and avoided straining himself again.
"The Letters of William James, Vol. II"
William James
I am afraid there must be a lesion of the bone.
"The Three Cities Trilogy: Paris, Vol. 2"
Emile Zola
No matter how he handled this, it held a fundamental lesion in the Skylark-fineness.
"She Buildeth Her House"
Will Comfort

Famous quotes with Lesion

  • The lesion is in the area of my brain that is responsible for motor function, so I have continual chronic pain in my left arm from elbow to fingertips and the right side of my body from my ear to my breast area.
    Karen Duffy
  • I’m a good person but a shitty writer. You’re a shitty person but a good writer. We’d make a good team. I don’t want to ask you any favors, but if you have time – and from what I saw, you have plenty – I was wondering if you could write a eulogy for Hazel. I’ve got notes and everything, but if you could just make it into a coherent whole or whatever? Or even just tell me what I should say differently. Here’s the thing about Hazel: Almost everyone is obsessed with leaving a mark upon the world. Bequeathing a legacy. Outlasting death. We all want to be remembered. I do, too. That’s what bothers me most, is being another unremembered casualty in the ancient and inglorious war against disease. I want to leave a mark. But Van Houten: The marks humans leave are too often scars. You build a hideous minimall or start a coup or try to become a rock star and you think, “They’ll remember me now,” but (a) they don’t remember you, and (b) all you leave behind are more scars. Your coup becomes a dictatorship. Your minimall becomes a lesion. (Okay, maybe I’m not such a shitty writer. But I can’t pull my ideas together, Van Houten. My thoughts are stars I can’t fathom into constellations.) We are like a bunch of dogs squirting on fire hydrants. We poison the groundwater with our toxic piss, marking everything MINE in a ridiculous attempt to survive our deaths. I can’t stop pissing on fire hydrants. I know it’s silly and useless – epically useless in my current state – but I am an animal like any other. Hazel is different. She walks lightly, old man. She walks lightly upon the earth. Hazel knows the truth: We’re as likely to hurt the universe as we are to help it, and we’re not likely to do either. People will say it’s sad that she leaves a lesser scar, that fewer remember her, that she was loved deeply but not widely. But it’s not sad, Van Houten. It’s triumphant. It’s heroic. Isn’t that the real heroism? Like the doctors say: First, do no harm. The real heroes anyway aren’t the people doing things; the real heroes are the people NOTICING things, paying attention. The guy who invented the smallpox vaccine didn’t actually invent anything. He just noticed that people with cowpox didn’t get smallpox. After my PET scan lit up, I snuck into the ICU and saw her while she was unconscious. I just walked in behind a nurse with a badge and I got to sit next to her for like ten minutes before I got caught. I really thought she was going to die, too. It was brutal: the incessant mechanized haranguing of intensive care. She had this dark cancer water dripping out of her chest. Eyes closed. Intubated. But her hand was still her hand, still warm and the nails painted this almost black dark almost blue color, and I just held her hand and tried to imagine the world without us and for about one second I was a good enough person to hope she died so she would never know that I was going, too. But then I wanted more time so we could fall in love. I got my wish, I suppose. I left my scar. A nurse guy came in and told me I had to leave, that visitors weren’t allowed, and I asked if she was doing okay, and the guy said, “She’s still taking on water.” A desert blessing, an ocean curse. What else? She is so beautiful. You don’t get tired of looking at her. You never worry if she is smarter than you: You know she is. She is funny without ever being mean. I love her. I am so lucky to love her, Van Houten. You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers."
    John Green (author)
  • Tertiary syphilis, as my readers will not need reminding perhaps, comes, when it comes at all, about ten years after the initial infection. About two thirds of syphilitics miss it, especially if they are women or coloured. It is believed, though without solid evidence, that it attacks the sedentary more than the active. This means that writers and composers, granted that primary lesion, are prone to it.
    Anthony Burgess

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