What is another word for excrement?

Pronunciation: [ˈɛkskɹɪmənt] (IPA)

Excrement is a word that often gets avoided in polite conversation, which is why many people search for synonyms. There are many alternative words that can be used to describe excrement. Some of the most common ones include feces, stool, droppings, waste, excreta, poop, dung, and manure. Each of these words describes the same thing, but with different connotations and levels of formality. For example, "manure" might be more appropriate when discussing animal waste used as fertilizer, while "poop" is a more relaxed term often used with children. Whichever synonym is chosen, it's important to use it appropriately depending on the context and audience.

Synonyms for Excrement:

What are the paraphrases for Excrement?

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  • Equivalence

  • Reverse Entailment

    • Noun, singular or mass
      dung.
  • Independent

  • Other Related

What are the hypernyms for Excrement?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

Famous quotes with Excrement

  • In its famous paradox, the equation of money and excrement, psychoanalysis becomes the first science to state what common sense and the poets have long known - that the essence of money is in its absolute worthlessness.
    Norman O. Brown
  • Usenet is like a herd of performing elephants with diarrhea -- massive, difficult to redirect, awe-inspiring, entertaining, and a source of mind- boggling amounts of excrement when you least expect it.
    Gene Spafford
  • In its famous paradox, the equation of money and excrement, psychoanalysis becomes the first science to state what common sense and the poets have long known -- that the essence of money is in its absolute worthlessness.
    Norman O. Brown
  • Naturally, it isn't the mere fact of being named that brings about the hoax of being a "real person"; it is all that goes with it. The child is tricked into the ego-feeling by the attitudes, words, and actions of the society which surrounds him—his parents, relatives, teachers, and, above all, his similarly hoodwinked peers. Other people teach us who we are. Their attitudes to us are the mirror in which we learn to see ourselves, but the mirror is distorted. We are, perhaps, rather dimly aware of the immense power of our social environment. We seldom realize, for example, that our most private thoughts and emotions are not actually our own. For we think in terms of languages and images which we did not invent, but which were given to us by our society. We copy emotional reactions from our parents, learning from them that excrement is supposed to have a disgusting smell and that vomiting is supposed to be an unpleasant sensation. The dread of death is also learned from their anxieties about sickness and from their attitudes to funerals and corpses. Our social environment has this power just because we do not exist apart from a society. Society is our extended mind and body.
    Alan Watts
  • Aristotle sees no difference between the falling of a leaf or a stone and the death of the good and noble people in the ship; nor does he distinguish between the destruction of a multitude of ants by an ox depositing on them his excrement and the death of worshippers killed by the fall of the house when its foundations give way. In short, the opinion of Aristotle is this: Everything is the result of management which is constant, which does not come to an end and does not change any of its properties, as , the heavenly beings, and everything which continues according to a certain rule... But that which is not constant, and does not follow a certain rule... is due to chance and not to management; it is in no relation to Divine Providence. Aristotle holds that it is even impossible to ascribe to Providence that management of these things. ...It is the belief of those who turned away from our Law and said: "God hath forsaken the earth." (Ezek. ix. 9)
    Aristotle

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