What is another word for scudding?

Pronunciation: [skˈʌdɪŋ] (IPA)

Scudding is a word used to describe the movement of clouds, waves, or anything that moves swiftly and with a low, flat shape. There are several synonyms that can be used instead of scudding, such as flying, racing, dashing, darting, streaking, rushing, streaming, whisking, skimming, and gliding. These words can be used to describe the movement of different objects and phenomena, like planes in the sky, boats on the water, cars on the road, or even animals running. Whatever is in motion, the use of these synonyms can add variety and depth to one's writing, making it more engaging and descriptive.

Synonyms for Scudding:

What are the hypernyms for Scudding?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the opposite words for scudding?

Scudding is a word that closely relates to clouds, as it often refers to the movement of clouds across the sky at a high speed. Antonyms for scudding might include slow, stationary, and calm. These words describe a different pace and motion than scudding, indicating a lack of movement or limited motion. Other antonyms might include settled, stagnant, and still, which further emphasize the absence of movement. These words might be used when talking about weather patterns or other natural phenomena, or in a more figurative sense to describe a lack of progress or activity.

What are the antonyms for Scudding?

Usage examples for Scudding

The sky was clear and deep, with little white clouds scudding across it; larks were singing, and in the distance sounds of men at work in the fields were heard.
"Cornwall"
G. E. Mitton
Culligore, evidently hesitating to use his electric flash for fear of becoming a target for the Phantom's pistol, was scudding hither and thither at the opposite end of the cellar.
"The Gray Phantom's Return"
Herman Landon
The scudding like a sea-mew, with the hand Firm on the tiller!
"A Woman's Love Letters"
Sophie M. Almon-Hensley

Famous quotes with Scudding

  • It little profits that an idle king,By this still hearth, among these barren crags,Matchd with an aged wife, I mete and doleUnequal laws unto a savage race,That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. I cannot rest from travel; I will drinkLife to the lees. All times I have enjoydGreatly, have sufferd greatly, both with thoseThat loved me, and alone; on shore, and whenThro scudding drifts the rainy HyadesVext the dim sea. I am become a name;For always roaming with a hungry heartMuch have I seen and known,cities of menAnd manners, climates, councils, governments,Myself not least, but honord of them all,And drunk delight of battle with my peers,Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy. I am a part of all that I have met;Yet all experience is an arch wherethroGleams that untravelld world whose margin fadesFor ever and for ever when I move. How dull it is to pause, to make an end,To rust unburnishd, not to shine in use!As tho to breathe were life! Life piled on lifeWere all too little, and of one to meLittle remains; but every hour is savedFrom that eternal silence, something more,A bringer of new things; and vile it wereFor some three suns to store and hoard myself,And this gray spirit yearning in desireTo follow knowledge like a sinking star,Beyond the utmost bound of human thought. It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,And see the great Achilles, whom we knew. Tho much is taken, much abides; and thoWe are not now that strength which in old daysMoved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are,One equal temper of heroic hearts,Made weak by time and fate, but strong in willTo strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
    Alfred Tennyson

Related words: High scudding, low scudding, dry scudding, wet scudding, a type of scudding, what is scudding, what does scudding mean, how do you spell scudding

Related questions:

  • what is scudding in sailing? what does scudding mean in sailing? what is the definition of scudding in sailing?
  • Word of the Day

    high crime
    The antonyms of "high crime" are "petty crime," "misdemeanor," and "minor offense." These terms refer to less serious crimes that typically result in less severe consequences, such...