What is another word for wedged?

Pronunciation: [wˈɛd͡ʒd] (IPA)

When we think of the word "wedged," we often picture something that's stuck or tightly jammed in a space. However, there are many different synonyms that can be used to describe this concept. For example, you might say that something is lodged, wedged in, or wedged tight. Other options include jammed, stuck, trapped, or fixed. Depending on the context, you might also choose words like secured, anchored, or immobilized. These synonyms can help you add variety to your writing and express the idea of something being tightly wedged or stuck in a more nuanced way.

What are the paraphrases for Wedged?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
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What are the hypernyms for Wedged?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the opposite words for wedged?

Wedged refers to two things or objects pressed together tightly. The opposite of wedged is free or loosen. Unwedged indicates an object is not compressed or trapped between narrow spaces. Unstuck refers to the ability of an object to be easily removed, whereas locked all means fixed in place or jammed. The term unfastened refers to something that was previously secured, but now it is free, and unclamped suggests that an object was held in place, but it has been released. The term dislodged suggests that something was removed or moved from its previous position. Finally, detaching refers to the separating of two objects or things.

What are the antonyms for Wedged?

Usage examples for Wedged

Patty was wedged in between her parents.
"Jane Oglander"
Marie Belloc Lowndes
But the second shot was entirely unnecessary, for the dreadful cat lay like a rag, flattened out, with nose close to the ground and claws wedged in the grass-almost without a quiver.
"In Desert and Wilderness"
Henryk Sienkiewicz
He was aware that if the mass of timber, which grew rapidly larger, once wedged itself fast, it might be a month or two before a flood broke it up; but he had also sense enough to recognize that, since most of the men's efforts were futile, he might just as well sit still.
"The Greater Power"
Harold Bindloss W. Herbert Dunton

Famous quotes with Wedged

  • The greater part of the time I spent, when I talked at all, talking to men. I liked to take luncheon in some pub or other, sitting on a high stool at the snack-counter, barons of beef, hams, salads and dishes of pickle spread before me, the server in his tall white cap carving with skill. Other male eaters would be wedged against me, champing over newspapers, and there were a peculiar animal content in being among warm silent men, raising glasses in smacking silent toasts to themselves, the automatic ‘ah’ after the draught, the forkful of red beef and mustard pickle. Sitting with my gin or whisky afterwards I would often manage to get into conversation with some lonely man or other – usually an exile like myself – and the talk would be about the world, air-routes and shipping-lines, drinking-places thousands of miles away. Then I felt happy, felt I had come home, because home to people like me is not a place but all places, all places except the one we happen to be in at the moment.
    Anthony Burgess
  • While clearly a masterpiece, suffers from one fairly serious flaw — that of outright unreadability. This reviewer should know, because he has just read it. … Looming like one of the Don's chimerical adversaries, it is a giant...But the giant has a giant weight problem and is elderly, and soft-brained. Reading can be compared to an indefinite visit from your most impossible senior relative, with all his pranks, dirty habits, unstoppable reminiscences, and terrible cronies. When the experience is over, and the old boy checks out at last (on page 846 — the prose wedged tight, with no breaks for dialogue), you will shed tears all right; not tears of relief or regret but tears of pride. You made it, despite all that could do.
    Miguel de Cervantes
  • Like Bradley Pearson in , 'N', as he is called, uses quotation marks for such vulgarisms as 'sulks,' 'commuters' and 'worthwhile activities', as well as for phrases like 'too good to be true', 'the wrong end of the stick' and 'keep in touch.' The reader reflects that a cliché or approximation, wedged between two inverted commas, is still a cliché or approximation. Besides, you see how it would 'get on your nerves' if I were to 'go on' like this 'the whole time'...
    Martin Amis
  • While clearly an impregnable masterpiece, suffers from one fairly serious flaw - that of outright unreadability. This reviewer should know, because he has just read it. The book bristles with beauties, charm, sublime comedy; it is also, for long stretches (approaching about 75 per cent of the whole), inhumanly dull.... Reading can be compared to an indefinite visit from your most impossible senior relative, with all his pranks, dirty habits, unstoppable reminiscences, and terrible cronies. When the experience is over, and the old boy checks out at last (on page 846 - the prose wedged tight, with no breaks for dialogue), you will shed tears all right: not tears of relief but tears of pride. You made it, despite all that could do.
    Martin Amis
  • Of all the ridiculous expressions people use--and people use a great many ridiculous expressions--one of the most ridiculous is "No news is good news." "No news is good news" simply means that if you don't hear from someone, everything is probably fine, and you can see at once why this expression makes such little sense, because everything being fine is only one of many, many reasons why someone may not contact you. Perhaps they are tied up. Maybe they are surrounded by fierce weasels, or perhaps they are wedged tightly between two refrigerators and cannot get themselves out. The expression might as well be changed to "no news is bad news," except that people may not be able to contact you because they have just been crowned king or are competing in a gymnastics tournament. The point is that there is no way to know why someone has not contacted you, until they contact you and explain themselves. For this reason, the sensible expression would be "no news is no news," except that it is so obvious that it is hardly an expression at all.
    Daniel Handler

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