What is another word for Caught?

Pronunciation: [kˈɔːt] (IPA)

Caught is a versatile word that can be used to describe various situations. However, sometimes we need to use synonyms for caught depending on the context. Some synonyms for caught are seized, apprehended, captured, snatched, arrested, trapped, cornered, and ensnared. These words can be used to describe different scenarios like catching a thief, capturing a wild animal, or getting stuck in a trap. It's important to choose the right synonym to ensure clear communication and avoid confusion. By using synonyms for caught, we can add richness and variety to our vocabulary and express ourselves more effectively.

What are the paraphrases for Caught?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
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What are the hypernyms for Caught?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the opposite words for Caught?

Caught is a verb that refers to the act of capturing or seizing someone or something. Antonyms are words that have the opposite meaning of a given word. Some antonyms for the word caught include released, set free, let go, escaped, and freed. These words imply that something or someone was not captured or seized, but rather was allowed to go free or was able to escape. In contrast, caught is a past tense verb that describes a successful attempt at catching or capturing. Antonyms can be helpful in expressing different shades of meaning and providing clarity in communication.

What are the antonyms for Caught?

Usage examples for Caught

It Caught on the balloon.
"Leo the Circus Boy"
Ralph Bonehill
Did you ever get Caught?
"My Lady of the Chimney Corner"
Alexander Irvine
Mignon had Caught the ball.
"Marjorie Dean High School Freshman"
Pauline Lester

Famous quotes with Caught

  • Actually, one of the TSA guys showed me the Entertainment Weekly with the poster from the original in it, which also mentioned they were doing a remake. Caught me totally by surprise.
    Michael Berryman
  • Caught up in life, you see it badly. You suffer from it or enjoy it too much. The artist, in my opinion, is a monstrosity, something outside of nature.
    Gustave Flaubert
  • Well, The Day the Earth Caught Fire was a story... I don't if anybody knows what it is but it was about... in the early days of testing nuclear bombs, that Russia and America happened to test a nuclear bomb at the same moment at different ends of the earth.
    Val Guest
  • Entangled in a hundred worldly snares, Self-seeking men, by ignorance deluded, Strive by unrighteous means to pile up riches. Then, in their self-complacency, they say, ?This acquisition I have made to-day, That will I gain to-morrow, so much pelf Is hoarded up already, so much more Remains that I have yet to treasure up. This enemy I have destroyed, him also, And others in their turn, I will despatch. I am a lord; I will enjoy myself; I?m wealthy, noble, strong, successful, happy; I?m absolutely perfect; no one else In all the world can be compared to me. Now will I offer up a sacrifice, Give gifts with lavish hand, and be triumphant.? Such men, befooled by endless vain conceits, Caught in the meshes of the world?s illusion, Immersed in sensuality, descend Down to the foulest hell of unclean spirits.*
    Mahabharata
  • In televisionland we are all sophisticated enough now to realize that every statistic has an equal and opposite statistic somewhere in the universe. It is not a candidate's favorite statistic per se that engages us, but the assurance with which he can use it. We are testing the candidates for self-confidence, for "Presidentiality" in statistical bombardment. It doesn't really matter if their statistics be homemade. What settles the business is the cool with which they are dropped. And so, as the second half hour treads the decimaled path toward the third hour, we become aware of being locked in a tacit conspiracy with the candidates. We know their statistics go to nothing of importance, and they know we know, and we know they know we know. There is total but unspoken agreement that the "debate," the arguments which are being mustered here, are of only the slightest importance. As in some primitive ritual, we all agree — candidates and onlookers — to pretend we are involved in a debate, although the real exercise is a test of style and manners. Which of the competitors can better execute the intricate maneuvers prescribed by a largely irrelevant ritual? This accounts for the curious lack of passion in both performers. Even when Ford accuses Carter of inconsistency, it is done in a flat, emotionless, game-playing style. The delivery has the tuneless ring of an old press release from the Republican National Committee. Just so, when Carter has an opportunity to set pulses pounding by denouncing the Nixon pardon, he dances delicately around the invitation like a maiden skirting a bog. We judge that both men judge us to be drained of desire for passion in public life, to be looking for Presidents who are cool and noninflammable. They present themselves as passionless technocrats using an English singularly devoid of poetry, metaphor and even coherent forthright declaration. Caught up in the conspiracy, we watch their coolness with fine technical understanding and, in the final half hour, begin asking each other for technical judgments. How well is Carter exploiting the event to improve our image of him? Is Ford's television manner sufficiently self-confident to make us sense him as "Presidential"? It is quite extraordinary. Here we are, fully aware that we are being manipulated by image projectionists, yet happily asking ourselves how obligingly we are submitting to the manipulation. It is as though a rat running a maze were more interested in the psychologist's charts on his behavior than in getting the cheese at the goal line.
    Russell Baker

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