What is another word for conjurer?

Pronunciation: [kˈʌnd͡ʒjʊɹə] (IPA)

The word "conjurer" refers to a person who performs magic or tricks, but there are a few synonyms that can also be used. One such word is "sorcerer," which denotes a person who practices supernatural powers or magic. Another synonym for a conjurer is "magician," which is someone who performs illusions and tricks to entertain or bewilder the audience. "Wizard" is another synonym for a conjurer, often used in fantasy literature, meaning a person who uses magic to achieve their goals. Finally, the term "enchanter" signifies one who uses magical spells or charms to enchant or captivate someone's attention. All of these words have a similar meaning to "conjurer," and can be used interchangeably depending on the context.

Synonyms for Conjurer:

What are the paraphrases for Conjurer?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
Paraphrases are highlighted according to their relevancy:
- highest relevancy
- medium relevancy
- lowest relevancy
  • Equivalence

  • Forward Entailment

    • Noun, singular or mass
      wizard.

What are the hypernyms for Conjurer?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Conjurer?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.

Usage examples for Conjurer

Just within the threshold lay the reputed conjurer.
"Bracebridge Hall, or The Humorists"
Washington Irving
Perhaps leanness is an appendage to the science, for I never knew a corpulent conjurer.
"An History of Birmingham (1783)"
William Hutton
How the conjurer is going to perform the wonderful feat?
"Only One Love, or Who Was the Heir"
Charles Garvice

Famous quotes with Conjurer

  • Prejudice is the conjurer of imaginary wrongs, strangling truth, overpowering reason, making strong men weak and weak men weaker. God give us the large hearted charity which "bearth all things, believe all things, hope all things, endure all things," which "thinks no evil."
    Macduff

Word of the Day

Cortical Blindness
Cortical blindness is a term used to describe the loss of vision resulting from damage to the visual cortex of the brain. In contrast, the antonyms for cortical blindness refer to ...