What is another word for bombardment?

Pronunciation: [bəmbˈɑːdmənt] (IPA)

Bombardment is a word that refers to the act of continuously attacking a place or a person by using a weapon or a lot of something. Some synonyms for "bombardment" are "assault," "barrage," "onslaught," "blitz," "shelling," and "bomber." An assault is an attack that is made with the intention of causing harm or damage to a person or place. On the other hand, a barrage is an intensive and continuous fire of artillery, missiles, or other weapons. Another synonym for "bombardment" is "onslaught," which describes a forceful or powerful attack made by a group, army, or a person.

Synonyms for Bombardment:

What are the paraphrases for Bombardment?

Paraphrases are restatements of text or speech using different words and phrasing to convey the same meaning.
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What are the hypernyms for Bombardment?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Bombardment?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.
  • hyponyms for bombardment (as nouns)

What are the opposite words for bombardment?

Bombardment, a word that means an intense and continuous attack, can be expressed with various antonyms. Instead of a heavy and constant barrage, one could describe a calm environment with peace or tranquility. Moreover, instead of aggressive and ruthless bombing, bombardment can be countered with diplomatic communication or negotiations. Instead of a storm of bullets, bombardment can be substituted with soft expressions of kindness and tenderness. Other antonyms for bombardment include quiet, silence, stillness, and relaxation. By using these antonyms, individuals can create an opposing atmosphere that negates or lessens the impact of the bombardment.

What are the antonyms for Bombardment?

Usage examples for Bombardment

A man on a bicycle had sped by them the day before and announced the bombardment and destruction of their native city!
"My Home In The Field of Honor"
Frances Wilson Huard
I have been here, as you say, alone, all through the war, since the day of the first bombardment.
"From Bapaume to Passchendaele, 1917"
Philip Gibbs
There was no preliminary bombardment.
"From Bapaume to Passchendaele, 1917"
Philip Gibbs

Famous quotes with Bombardment

  • The first stage had been all over before the doctors even knew they were dealing with a new sickness; it was the direct reaction to the bombardment of the body, at the moment when the bomb went off, by neutrons, beta particles, and gamma rays.
    John Hersey
  • Many people, among them the Frank girls, slept leaning against their mother or father; everyone was dead tired. And then the tension: what would happen next? Perhaps the train would crash? There might be a bombardment; we were hoping for that. (...) A lot of people slept. It was simply a death train. People died [while] underway, and there were many dead when we arrived. I believe that we were in those cattle cars for two days and nights. After the war someone asked me: "Didn't you get anything to eat?" No, we didn't get anything, absolutely nothing.
    Lenie de Jong-van Naarden
  • In televisionland we are all sophisticated enough now to realize that every statistic has an equal and opposite statistic somewhere in the universe. It is not a candidate's favorite statistic per se that engages us, but the assurance with which he can use it. We are testing the candidates for self-confidence, for "Presidentiality" in statistical bombardment. It doesn't really matter if their statistics be homemade. What settles the business is the cool with which they are dropped. And so, as the second half hour treads the decimaled path toward the third hour, we become aware of being locked in a tacit conspiracy with the candidates. We know their statistics go to nothing of importance, and they know we know, and we know they know we know. There is total but unspoken agreement that the "debate," the arguments which are being mustered here, are of only the slightest importance. As in some primitive ritual, we all agree — candidates and onlookers — to pretend we are involved in a debate, although the real exercise is a test of style and manners. Which of the competitors can better execute the intricate maneuvers prescribed by a largely irrelevant ritual? This accounts for the curious lack of passion in both performers. Even when Ford accuses Carter of inconsistency, it is done in a flat, emotionless, game-playing style. The delivery has the tuneless ring of an old press release from the Republican National Committee. Just so, when Carter has an opportunity to set pulses pounding by denouncing the Nixon pardon, he dances delicately around the invitation like a maiden skirting a bog. We judge that both men judge us to be drained of desire for passion in public life, to be looking for Presidents who are cool and noninflammable. They present themselves as passionless technocrats using an English singularly devoid of poetry, metaphor and even coherent forthright declaration. Caught up in the conspiracy, we watch their coolness with fine technical understanding and, in the final half hour, begin asking each other for technical judgments. How well is Carter exploiting the event to improve our image of him? Is Ford's television manner sufficiently self-confident to make us sense him as "Presidential"? It is quite extraordinary. Here we are, fully aware that we are being manipulated by image projectionists, yet happily asking ourselves how obligingly we are submitting to the manipulation. It is as though a rat running a maze were more interested in the psychologist's charts on his behavior than in getting the cheese at the goal line.
    Russell Baker
  • Very seldom, only in rare moments of clarity, only after ages of misapprehension, did a few of them, here and there, now and again, begin to have the deeper insight into the world’s nature and man’s. And no sooner had this precious insight begun to propagate itself, than it would be blotted out by some small or great disaster, by epidemic disease, by the spontaneous disruption of society, by an access of racial imbecility, by a prolonged bombardment of meteorites, or by the mere cowardice and vertigo that dared not look down the precipice of fact.
    Olaf Stapledon
  • It is just as much a matter of chance that I am still alive as that I might have been hit. In a bomb-proof dugout I might have been smashed to atoms, and in the open survive ten hours' bombardment unscathed. No soldier survives a thousand chances. But every soldier believes in Chance and trusts his luck.
    Erich Maria Remarque

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