What is another word for courtier?

Pronunciation: [kˈɔːtɪə] (IPA)

The word courtier traditionally refers to a person who frequents the court of a monarch or other high-ranking noble. But there are many synonyms that can be used to describe someone who fits this mold. Some possible alternatives include attendant, flatterer, hanger-on, minion, sycophant, and yes-man. Each of these words conveys a slightly different shade of meaning but all describe someone who is seeking to curry favor with a powerful figure. Other words that might be used to describe a courtier could include adviser, counselor, confidante, diplomat, or envoy, depending on the specific nature of their role at court.

Synonyms for Courtier:

What are the paraphrases for Courtier?

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  • Other Related

    • Proper noun, singular
      broker.

What are the hypernyms for Courtier?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Courtier?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.

Usage examples for Courtier

The Capernaum courtier who came to Jesus expecting to bring Him down with him to heal his boy, when he saw Him felt he could trust Him, and returned alone.
"The Expositor's Bible: The Gospel of St. John, Vol. I"
Marcus Dods
Translators might find their tasks difficult enough and they might flag by the way, as Hoby confesses to have done at the end of the third book of The courtier, but plucking up courage, they went on to the end.
"Early Theories of Translation"
Flora Ross Amos
Before many days had passed, Freyo had become the child's favorite courtier, and was a favorite of the whole Court likewise.
"The Green Forest Fairy Book"
Loretta Ellen Brady

Famous quotes with Courtier

  • Perhaps one of the only positive pieces of advice that I was ever given was that supplied by an old courtier who observed: Only two rules really count. Never miss an opportunity to relieve yourself; never miss a chance to sit down and rest your feet.
    King Edward VIII
  • The best servants of the people, like the best valets, must whisper unpleasant truths in the master's ear. It is the court fool, not the foolish courtier, whom the king can least afford to lose.
    Walter Lippmann
  • The best servants of the people, like the best valets, must whisper unpleasant truths in the master's ear. It is the court fool, not the foolish courtier, whom the king can least afford to lose.
    Walter Lippmann
  • ...in his case it went further and became indifference to social distinction. Never once in forty years of intimacy did his son notice in him a trace of snobbishness. He was one of the exceedingly small number of Americans to whom an English duke or duchess seemed to be indifferent, and royalty itself nothing more than a slightly inconvenient presence. This was, it is true, rather the tone of English society in his time, but Americans were largely responsible for changing it, and Mr. Adams had every possible reason for affecting the manner of a courtier even if he did not feel the sentiment. Never did his son see him flatter or vilify, or show a sign of envy or jealousy; never a shade of vanity or self-conceit. Never a tone of arrogance! Never a gesture of pride!
    Henry Adams
  • The marigold, whose courtier's face Echoes the sun, and doth unlace Her at his rise, at his full stop Packs and shuts up her gaudy shop.
    John Cleveland

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