What is another word for baron?

Pronunciation: [bˈaɹən] (IPA)

Baron, a noble title that holds significant value in the feudal system of Europe, has several synonyms that people may use interchangeably. Some synonyms of baron include lord, earl, count, viscount, marquess, and duke. Each of these titles represents a rank in the hierarchy of the nobility and is associated with a particular degree of power and wealth. While all these titles are considered noble, the higher the rank, the greater the status and wealth. Overall, people use these words synonymously to refer to the upper-class people who have significant influence and power over others.

Synonyms for Baron:

What are the paraphrases for Baron?

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  • Reverse Entailment

    • Proper noun, singular
      barone.
  • Other Related

    • Proper noun, singular
      baroness, Barron.

What are the hypernyms for Baron?

A hypernym is a word with a broad meaning that encompasses more specific words called hyponyms.

What are the hyponyms for Baron?

Hyponyms are more specific words categorized under a broader term, known as a hypernym.

What are the opposite words for baron?

Baron, a title conferred upon a wealthy and influential person, has several antonyms that represent contrasting meanings. The opposites of "baron" include words like "commoner," "peasant," and "serf" - which signify individuals belonging to lower classes of society with little or no influence or power. These antonyms suggest a lack of wealth, prestige, and authority, which are often associated with the title "baron." Another antonym for "baron" is "proletarian," referring to a member of the working-class who lacks access to resources and decision-making power. In essence, the antonyms for "baron" highlight the class differences in society and represent the opposite of the privilege and status associated with the title.

What are the antonyms for Baron?

Usage examples for Baron

Among the charges of his enemies was that, as Minister of the Interior in 1892, he had held, but had kept secret, the famous list of the "Hundred and Four" and had prevented the seizure of the papers of baron de Reinach and the arrest of Arton.
"A History of the Third French Republic"
C. H. C. Wright
Their position is singularly like the phase of Russian nihilism described by baron Fircks, and presented to us in Turgenieff's novels.
"Contemporary Socialism"
John Rae
Third, both baron Fircks and Koscheleff think nihilism was largely due to the arbitrary government of the country.
"Contemporary Socialism"
John Rae

Famous quotes with Baron

  • Of all tyrannies a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.
    Clive Staples Lewis
  • He signed himself prince of this, lord of that, baron of the other thing and claimant to the dukedom of something else.
    Murray Leinster
  • The Industrial Revolution, too, failed to introduce a reign of freedom and happiness: it converted the medieval serf into an industrial slave; replaced the feudal baron by the industrial mogul, created in its wake an ever-growing, ever-shifting class of declassés, who had neither pride of ancestry nor love of tradition... The age of machine and competition, of capital, class-struggle, and demagogy was upon man.
    Tobias Dantzig
  • I am a democrat because I believe that no man or group of men is good enough to be trusted with uncontrolled power over others. And the higher the pretensions of such power, the more dangerous I think it both to the rulers and to the subjects. Hence Theocracy is the worst of all governments. If we must have a tyrant a robber baron is far better than an inquisitor. The baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity at some point be sated, and since he dimly knows he is doing wrong he may possibly repent. But the inquisitor who mistakes his own cruelty and lust of power and fear for the voice of Heaven will torment us infinitely because he torments us with the approval of his own conscience and his better impulses appear to him as temptations. And since Theocracy is the worst, the nearer any government approaches to Theocracy the worse it will be. A metaphysic, held by the rulers with the force of a religion, is a bad sign. It forbids them, like the inquisitor, to admit any grain of truth or good in their opponents, it abrogates the ordinary rules of morality, and it gives a seemingly high, super-personal sanction to all the very ordinary human passions by which, like other men, the rulers will frequently be actuated. In other words, it forbids wholesome doubt...
    C. S. Lewis
  • Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a Hell of earth. This very kindness stings with intolerable insult. To be "cured" against one's will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals.
    C. S. Lewis

Word of the Day

worldly wise
Synonyms:
on to, wised up, alive, apprehensive, brainy, bright, brilliant, canny, clever, cognizant.